Tag Archives: club

The Spring 2015 Mizzou Mag Club Trip, in Quotes

Select quotes from the annual Mizzou Magazine Club trip to New York, where we toured magazines, quizzed editors and mingled with alumni. These quotes tell the story of what we learned.

“Nobody gets hired on GPA, where you went to school, how you structure your resume… It’s who you are.”

Ryan D’Agostino, Editor-in-Chief of Popular Mechanics and former manager of the band Dispatch

“If you end up working at a smaller publication and doing a lot, that can sometimes be better.”

Sara Gaynes Levy, Features Editor of SELF Magazine, talking about summer internship opportunities

“Look for where there is a need and fill it. Every magazine has a blind spot.”

Jesse Kissinger, Assistant Editor of Esquire giving internship advice

Touring SELF Magazine with Tova Diamond.
Touring SELF Magazine with Tova Diamond.

“If you’re not up for a wild adventure for the next ten years, find a different career.”

Richard Dorment, Senior Editor of Esquire Magazine

“Your ideas should always outsize your resources.”

Andrew Del-Colle, Senior Editor of Popular Mechanics and WVU and MU grad

“It’s sexist, it’s disgusting… It makes more money than anything we publish.”

Mark Godich, Senior Editor of Sports Illustrated and MU graduate, talking about the annual Swimsuit Edition of SI

 

Real talk with Mara Reinstein of Us Weekly
Real talk with Mara Reinstein of Us Weekly

“Your magazine must always be evolving – as an editor, that’s your role.”

Lindsay Schallon, Features Editor of Seventeen Magazine and MU grad

“I think there’s a lot more value in personal experiences than people realize.”

Tova Diamond, Senior Designer of SELF Magazine and MU grad, talking about independent passion projects

“Don’t be afraid to tell people what you’re gonna do – don’t just have them tell you what to do.”

Joe Bargmann, Special Projects Director of Popular Mechanics

“I suggest you live life beyond your wildest dreams.”

– Allyson Torrisi, Director of Photography at Popular Mechanics

 

 

Why you should learn Dataviz now

The other weekend I sat in on a Data Visualization introductory class taught over three days by three professionals in the business: Chris Canipe of The Wall Street Journal, Andrew Garcia Phillips of ChartBall.com, and Leah Becerra of the Omaha World-Herald.

In a quick and dirty 16-hour sprint, we were introduced to programming a variety of tools, including HighCharts, D3, and various text editing software.

Using these tools, we built a basic interactive graph using raw sports data. Numbers go in, beautiful pictures come out. This stuff is cutting edge – peep some gorgeous examples here. One of Mizzou’s own used these kinds of data visualizations to win a Pulitzer, and these graphics are common at the New York Times and The WSJ.

The weekend was crazy. Basically, a whole bunch of journalism nerds got together and did nerdy journalism stuff. And it was exceedingly awesome, and you should feel bad that you missed it.

But fret not – you can learn these highly demanded skills on your own with a little determination. Here’s why (and how) you should.

1. Because it’s part of the future of journalism. Take a look at journalism’s history and you’ll notice the people on the cutting edge are always the most successful, whether it’s Ben Franklin and his printing presses or ABC and color television. Take a lesson from the greats and secure your spot in journalism’s shining future, or something like that.

2. Because it’s a wild storytelling tool that helps audiences process the internet’s infinite stores of data. Journalists are no longer “gatekeepers” – if people want to know something, they can find any information they want on the internet. The flipside? There’s so much data, so many websites, that people get turned off by the gushing stream. Data visualizations help people process and explore vast amounts of data. All you do is hold their hand through it.

3. BECAUSE YOU CAN LEARN IT ON YOUR OWN FOR FREE. Like, seriously. Programming is becoming an easy skill to learn on your own, and all the journalists who taught this course taught themselves first. Explore sites like CodeAcademy, TreeHouse, Github, and W3 schools and you could know as much as anyone with a computer science degree. For D3 specifically, start here.

4. Because if you’re a Mizzou student, we just started a data visualization club, and there might potentially be a class in the spring. Jump on it.